Explore Implicit Bias in Academia

Education researchers at University of Wisconsin created a video game called FairPlay to illustrate how implicit bias manifests itself in the world of biomedical research. Thanks to support from Fred Hutch Human Resources, I was able to attend a workshop hosted by the game creators at ABRCMS. In the game, you play Jamal Davis, an African American male, as he navigates his first few days and weeks as a new graduate student at a prestigious university. The game is available to download for free and can be played on Mac or Windows PCs. To download or read more about FairPlay, visit http://gameslearningsociety.org/fairplay_microsite/ Continue reading Explore Implicit Bias in Academia

Grad student Biswajit Paul receives Best Oral Presentation award at SACNAS conference

Fred Hutch graduate student Biswajit “Bish” Paul received the award for the “Best Oral Presentation in Cell Molecular Biology” at the annual meeting of the Society for Chicanos and Native Americans in Science, or SACNAS, held last month in Washington, D.C. SACNAS is the second largest conference for minority scientists in the US. Bish is a fifth-year doctoral candidate in the Molecular & Cellular Biology Program, an interdisciplinary program offered through Fred Hutch and the University of Washington in partnership with the Institute of Systems Biology and Center for Infectious Disease Research. He works in the laboratory of Dr. Hans-Peter … Continue reading Grad student Biswajit Paul receives Best Oral Presentation award at SACNAS conference

Microbiome researcher finds her niche

My research is supported by a diversity supplement to my mentor’s NIH R01 grant, and I have always been ashamed. I don’t usually tell people I have this funding unless I have to—not everyone is eligible, and I had to argue my eligibility (I am Filipino American). I was ashamed that I wasn’t a good enough candidate to get my own fellowship funding. I was ashamed that I had to rely on funding specifically set aside for scientists from minority or disadvantaged backgrounds to fund what I love doing. Most of all, I was ashamed that I couldn’t compete on … Continue reading Microbiome researcher finds her niche

External link to ‘Why is Science so Straight?’ — Interesting NYT Opinion Piece

‘Why is Science so Straight?’ — Interesting NYT Opinion Piece

In his New York Times opinion piece, Manil Suri, a professor of Mathematics at University of Maryland, brings some light to a question that has been a topic of interest within Hutch United: Can we identify data that demonstrate that lesbian, gay, … Continue reading ‘Why is Science so Straight?’ — Interesting NYT Opinion Piece

AWIS Honors Hutch United Member Dr. Julie Overbaugh for Scientific Advancement

Hutch United (HU) is proud to announce that one of our faculty board members, Dr. Julie Overbaugh, is being honored with the Award for Scientific Advancement by the Association for Women in Science (AWIS) Seattle chapter at the 3rd Annual Award Banquet on Wednesday, June 17th. Throughout her career, she has made significant contributions to the understanding of HIV transmission and pathogenesis and is widely recognized as a leader in the field. Dr. Overbaugh has a long-standing collaboration with research teams in Seattle and Kenya studying the HIV transmission risk in highly exposed women and in infants. In addition to … Continue reading AWIS Honors Hutch United Member Dr. Julie Overbaugh for Scientific Advancement

External link to Article: ‘Learning the Ways of the Force’ from The Chronicle of Higher Education

Article: ‘Learning the Ways of the Force’ from The Chronicle of Higher Education

Here’s a great piece from The Chronicle of Higher Education entitled ‘Learning the Ways of the Force:Advice to minority students in STEM fields on succeeding in graduate school‘, by Dr. W. Marcus Lambert. Dr. Lambert is the Director of Diversity, Recruitment, … Continue reading Article: ‘Learning the Ways of the Force’ from The Chronicle of Higher Education